Browsed by
Author: ashelley

Woodhall Manor, Sudbury Suffolk

Woodhall Manor, Sudbury Suffolk

The site of at least two previous moated manor houses In early Saxon times a lord’s ‘Halle’ stood within the defensive walls of the old borough town. The original manor of Sudbury even prior to the Norman Conquest, appears to have been entwined with the farmlands of Woodhall. As subsequently were the lands of ‘Places Manor and those of St Bartholomew’s Priory. In Anglo-Saxon times the manor of Sudbury belonged to the mother of the Mercian earls Edwin and Morchar….

Read More Read More

An Order for the Admission of Freemen of the City of Oxford

An Order for the Admission of Freemen of the City of Oxford

(Approved by Privy Council 2008) 1. Repeal of Existing Order The existing Order for the Admission of Freemen dated 12th October 1551 and all subsequent Orders or amendments made or expressed to be made pursuant thereto are hereby repealed. However, this repeal shall not prejudice or affect any right or interest acquired, or any liability incurred, or anything done or purported to be done pursuant to the said Order. 2. Qualifications for Admission The following persons if aged 18 years…

Read More Read More

Hyett’s of Gloucester and Painswick

Hyett’s of Gloucester and Painswick

The Hyett family have left an indelible mark on the history and landscape of Gloucestershire. They have had great influence on the Corporation of Gloucester and its civic affairs. Their legacy is also unique in the beautiful rococo garden laid out at Painswick. According to ‘Victorian County History’ of Gloucester on the subject of topography, from 1547 until 1720, there were very few changes in the plan or extent of Gloucester. However, it is important to be aware of much…

Read More Read More

The Alderman of Southburgh [Sudbury 1485]

The Alderman of Southburgh [Sudbury 1485]

To Mr. G. W. Fulcher, Sudbury 1856 Dear Sir. – Knowing the interest you take in anything connected with the history and antiquities of your native town, I send you the enclosed document. It contains a curious tale of old ancestral times, and its own history is not less remarkable. A friend of mine who happens to be an architect, discovered its original amongst a mass of unintelligible papers (for most of them were written in cypher) in a cupboard,…

Read More Read More

Recognition of Freemen

Recognition of Freemen

Much confusion lies between the recognition of admission to ‘Borough Freedom’ and that of admission to ‘membership’ of Borough Guilds/Gilds. All of whom may be referred to as ‘Freemen’. I beg your indulgence as I return once again to that much haunted subject of ‘Admissions to Borough Freedom’. The deviations over ‘rights of admission’ have troubled me for many years. The subject of rights of Admission to Borough Freedom is a legal entity that developed from early traditions. The present-day…

Read More Read More

Counsel’s Opinion on Traditions of Admission to Borough Freedom

Counsel’s Opinion on Traditions of Admission to Borough Freedom

Charles Sparrow QC 1973 and 1991 Claiming freedom otherwise than through a father. I am of opinion that, as a general principle, freedom by birth may be established through a grandfather or other ancestor more remote than a father. And I consider that freedom as a “son of a freeman” is available in the same way. At the outset it seems to me important to reflect that, in every place, one is dealing with a matter of custom, which will…

Read More Read More

NOTES on Rules of Admission to Freedom

NOTES on Rules of Admission to Freedom

The Freeman (Admission) Act 1763  The Freeman (Admission) Act 1763 is an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain (3 Geo III c. 15). The Act withheld the right to vote in Parliamentary elections, in those boroughs where honorary freemen could vote, from any freemen admitted to the freedom within twelve months of the first day of the election; it did not affect the rights of ordinary freemen, admitted by the custom of the borough in question. The Act was passed in response to a number of…

Read More Read More

The Admission of Sudbury’s Freemen

The Admission of Sudbury’s Freemen

(Information taken from ‘Suffolk County Town: A Sudbury Miscellany’ by Allan W. Berry; ‘A Short History of the Borough of Sudbury’ compiled from materials collected by W.W. Hodson, by C.F.D. Sperling; ‘History of Sudbury Suffolk’ by C.G. Grimwood and S.A. Kay; Sudbury ‘Cocket Books’ transcribed by Allan W. Berry The Freedom of Sudbury is a concept of rights and obligations derived from custom and tradition. A Freeman of Sudbury, (the title applies to both men and women), is any person…

Read More Read More

Freedom and Slavery

Freedom and Slavery

A Statement on behalf of Freemen and Guilds of England and Wales 1) ‘Freedom’ in the context of the Guilds of Freemen in England and Wales, has no connection with the release from the bondage of slavery, but rather the completion of a term of servitude through apprenticeship and the hereditary rights acquired through it. Nor must it be confused with the ‘honorary Freedom’ conferred on individuals by some cities, towns, or boroughs. 2) The power to create Freemen is…

Read More Read More

Trade and Transport

Trade and Transport

The early boroughs were military foundations that with the growth of the English kingdom became administrative centres. Their reeves, courts, markets, and mints were all under royal administration. Defence of the borough fell upon the landowners of the surrounding shires. By the eleventh century the original ‘military’ constitution was virtually obsolete. Mercantile interests, as traders settled under the protection of the borough’s peace, had tended to become dominant. The Port – In the dooms (codes) of Edward the Elder, the…

Read More Read More